pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky while filming Stalker (1979)

pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky while filming Solaris (1972)

fuckingfreud:

USSR. Russia. Moscow. Russian film director Andrei Tarkovsky. 1979.

(Gueorgui Pinkhassov)

y pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky on the set of Stalker (1979)

pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky on the set of Stalker (1979)

y sinemasanati:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Michelangelo Antonioni

sinemasanati:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Michelangelo Antonioni

y pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky (April 4, 1932 - December 29, 1986)

The director’s task is to recreate life, its movement, its contradictions, its dynamic and conflicts. It is his duty to reveal every iota of the truth he has seen, even if not everyone finds that truth acceptable. Of course an artist can lose his way, but even his mistakes are interesting provided they are sincere. For they represent the reality of his inner life, of the peregrinations and struggle into which the external world has thrown him.

pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky (April 4, 1932 - December 29, 1986)

The director’s task is to recreate life, its movement, its contradictions, its dynamic and conflicts. It is his duty to reveal every iota of the truth he has seen, even if not everyone finds that truth acceptable. Of course an artist can lose his way, but even his mistakes are interesting provided they are sincere. For they represent the reality of his inner life, of the peregrinations and struggle into which the external world has thrown him.

“Why do people go to the cinema? What takes them into a darkened room where, for two hours, they watch the play of shadows on a sheet? The search for entertainment? The need for a kind of drug? All over the world there are, indeed, entertainment firms and organizations which exploit cinema and television and spectacles of many other kinds. Our starting point, however, should not be there, but in the essential principles of cinema, which have to do with the human need to master and know the world. I think that what a person normally goes to the cinema for is time: for time lost or spent or not yet had. He goes there for living experience; for cinema, like no other art, widens, enhances and concentrates a person’s experience—and not only enhances it but makes it longer, significantly longer. That is the power of cinema: ‘stars’, story-lines and entertainment have nothing to do with it.”

“I see it as my duty to stimulate reflection on what is essentially human and eternal in each individual soul, and which all too often a person will pass by, even though his fate lies in his hands. He is too busy chasing after phantoms and bowing down to idols. In the end everything can be reduced to the one simple element which is all a person can count upon in his existence: the capacity to love. That element can grow within the soul to become the supreme factor which determines the meaning of a person’s life. My function is to make whoever sees my films aware of his need to love and to give his love, and aware that beauty is summoning him.”

Andrei Tarkovsky
April 4, 1932 — December 29, 1986

y Russian film director Andrei Tarkovsky and French director Robert Bresson receive awards for creative cinema at the 1983 Cannes Film Festival

Russian film director Andrei Tarkovsky and French director Robert Bresson receive awards for creative cinema at the 1983 Cannes Film Festival

y pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Sven Nykvist while filming The Sacrifice (1986)








The climactic scene at the end of The Sacrifice is a long tracking shot in which the main character - Alexander burns down his house and all his possessions. It was done in a single, six minute, fifty second take (it’s often misstated as Tarkovsky’s longest shot). The shot was very difficult to achieve. Initially, there was only one camera used, despite Sven Nykvist’s protest. While shooting the burning house, the camera jammed, ruining the footage.
The scene had to be re-shot, requiring a quick and very costly reconstruction of the house in two weeks. This time two cameras were set up on tracks, running parallel to each other. The footage in the final version of the film is the second take, which lasts for several minutes and ends abruptly because the camera had run through an entire reel in capturing the single shot. The cast and crew broke down in tears after the take was completed.

pickledelephant:

Andrei Tarkovsky and Sven Nykvist while filming The Sacrifice (1986)

The climactic scene at the end of The Sacrifice is a long tracking shot in which the main character - Alexander burns down his house and all his possessions. It was done in a single, six minute, fifty second take (it’s often misstated as Tarkovsky’s longest shot). The shot was very difficult to achieve. Initially, there was only one camera used, despite Sven Nykvist’s protest. While shooting the burning house, the camera jammed, ruining the footage.

The scene had to be re-shot, requiring a quick and very costly reconstruction of the house in two weeks. This time two cameras were set up on tracks, running parallel to each other. The footage in the final version of the film is the second take, which lasts for several minutes and ends abruptly because the camera had run through an entire reel in capturing the single shot. The cast and crew broke down in tears after the take was completed.