Orson Welles behind the scenes of Citizen Kane (1941)

Orson Welles behind the scenes of Citizen Kane (1941)

Q: Your films from Mother to The Host and Memories of Murder all have some form of social commentary, whether it’s about the relationships of mothers and sons, the ineptitude of the police, or science going too far. Is making social commentary what drives your ideas and filmmaking?

Bong Joon-ho: It’s not to say that the main purpose is to criticise or say something about society as a greater whole, but I’m more concerned with the individual and specific people and the human concerns that arise within a narrative. Because I’m obviously making films that concern Korean characters, I think there’s probably something in that regard of cultural sense in the peoples that I portray and the characters, but I think it’s also hard to separate an individual from the society that they come from, as well. So, for Memories of Murder, its main concern and question that really was at the center was why did these girls die at that point and why were the cops not able to find the killer and solve the mystery? Those are situational things that I think are more important of that era, of that time period in Korea. Something like The Host, the question would be why is this family struggling so on their own to solve this problem of their daughter being taken away. Why are they not being helped? Why are they alone in this struggle to do it? I think by asking those questions, you kind of have a greater picture of the other dilemmas that point to make that happen in a great societal whole. I think those are the things that I’m more concerned with more so than trying to target political commentary. (x)

Karidja Touré and ‘Girlhood’ director Céline Sciamma, photographed by Cecile Burban.


George Lucas with Amrish Puri behind the scenes of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)

George Lucas with Amrish Puri behind the scenes of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)

howtocatchamonster:

"I set out to make movies about girls from the girl’s point of view … a lot of films celebrate women, but most of the time it is men doing the talking, so it ends up being a man’s perspective on women, rather than an authentic experience of being female." - Céline Sciamma, director of Water Lilies, Tomboy and Girlhood.

howtocatchamonster:

"I set out to make movies about girls from the girl’s point of view … a lot of films celebrate women, but most of the time it is men doing the talking, so it ends up being a man’s perspective on women, rather than an authentic experience of being female." - Céline Sciamma, director of Water Lilies, Tomboy and Girlhood.

y 
“I really don’t see things as a director when I’m wearing my actor’s hat—that’s a stupid expression, but you get it. I would never dare disrespect an artist by telling him, ‘Have you thought about putting your camera there?’ I’m interested in being good and being credible. If ever I felt like there was a directing choice that would damage the quality of acting, I would probably ask questions.” — Xavier Dolan
Shot by Caitlin Cronenberg x W Magazine

“I really don’t see things as a director when I’m wearing my actor’s hat—that’s a stupid expression, but you get it. I would never dare disrespect an artist by telling him, ‘Have you thought about putting your camera there?’ I’m interested in being good and being credible. If ever I felt like there was a directing choice that would damage the quality of acting, I would probably ask questions.” — Xavier Dolan

Shot by Caitlin Cronenberg x W Magazine

"Jesse James was like a game of chicken; it was whoever blinked first. Eventually, people got sick of fighting over it … I actually had a lot of sympathy for those who didn’t see the movie the same way I did. I mean, I certainly had sympathy for Warner Bros., because they gave me 36 million dollars, and I delivered them a film they didn’t want or like. You know, you never want to run around and lose people’s money in this business, because you won’t go very far. At the same time, I really believed in what the film was. I thought it was something really special, so I wanted to protect it. It’s not like the changes which could have been made to it what have eliminated the financial trouble. It just would have been a bad film that didn’t work out, as opposed to a good film that didn’t work out.” - Andrew Dominik

John Turturro, Liev Schreiber, Vanessa Paradis and Woody Allen on-set of Fading Gigolo (2013)

y Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio on-set of The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio on-set of The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)